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Flesh and Stone Foundations of America - QU 201 http://www.foundationsofamerica.com/index.php 2017-11-22T22:07:43Z Joomla! 1.5 - Open Source Content Management Grand Central Station 155 2010-12-17T09:24:47Z 2010-12-17T09:24:47Z http://www.foundationsofamerica.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=427:grand-central-station-155&catid=41:built-to-last&Itemid=57 Administrator stleone@shorelineinternet.com <p><span style="font-family: tahoma,arial,helvetica,sans-serif;" mce_style="font-family: tahoma,arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: small;" mce_style="font-size: small;"><b><img src="http://foundationsofamerica.com/images/stories/220px-image-grand_central_station_outside_night_2.jpg" mce_src="http://foundationsofamerica.com/images/stories/220px-image-grand_central_station_outside_night_2.jpg" style="border: 0pt none; float: left; margin: 2px 6px;" mce_style="border: 0pt none; float: left; margin: 2px 6px;" border="0"></b></span></span><span style="font-family: tahoma,arial,helvetica,sans-serif;" mce_style="font-family: tahoma,arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: small;" mce_style="font-size: small;">Grand Central Station was designed by Whitney Warren in 1913. The base of Warren's monumental style of structure was used with the famous Stony Creek pink granite. The distinctive stonework that frames the storefronts and lines the covered taxi area of the terminal is visible to pedestrians on 42nd Street and Vanderbilt Avenue. Grand Central took 10 years to build and employed a number of engineers and architects. Grand Central Terminal is the largest train station in the world by number of platforms. They are on two levels, both below ground, with 41&nbsp;tracks on the upper level and 26 on the lower, though the total number of tracks along platforms and in&nbsp;rail yards exceeds 100. Stony Creek granite was supplied to finish the rest of the terminal and is displayed throughout the building.</span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family: tahoma,arial,helvetica,sans-serif;" mce_style="font-family: tahoma,arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: small;" mce_style="font-size: small;">Sources and Info:</span></span></p> <p><a href="http://www.grandcentralterminal.com/index.cfm" mce_href="http://www.grandcentralterminal.com/index.cfm"><img src="http://foundationsofamerica.com/images/stories/grand-central-station-address-2.jpg" mce_src="http://foundationsofamerica.com/images/stories/grand-central-station-address-2.jpg" border="0" height="213" width="408">http://www.grandcentralterminal.com/index.cfm</a><br />Deford, Deborah. <u>Flesh and Stone: Stony Creek and the Age of Granite</u>. Stony Creek, Connecticut: Stony Creek Quarry Workers Celebration, 2000.</p> <p><span style="font-family: tahoma,arial,helvetica,sans-serif;" mce_style="font-family: tahoma,arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: small;" mce_style="font-size: small;"><b><img src="http://foundationsofamerica.com/images/stories/220px-image-grand_central_station_outside_night_2.jpg" mce_src="http://foundationsofamerica.com/images/stories/220px-image-grand_central_station_outside_night_2.jpg" style="border: 0pt none; float: left; margin: 2px 6px;" mce_style="border: 0pt none; float: left; margin: 2px 6px;" border="0"></b></span></span><span style="font-family: tahoma,arial,helvetica,sans-serif;" mce_style="font-family: tahoma,arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: small;" mce_style="font-size: small;">Grand Central Station was designed by Whitney Warren in 1913. The base of Warren's monumental style of structure was used with the famous Stony Creek pink granite. The distinctive stonework that frames the storefronts and lines the covered taxi area of the terminal is visible to pedestrians on 42nd Street and Vanderbilt Avenue. Grand Central took 10 years to build and employed a number of engineers and architects. Grand Central Terminal is the largest train station in the world by number of platforms. They are on two levels, both below ground, with 41&nbsp;tracks on the upper level and 26 on the lower, though the total number of tracks along platforms and in&nbsp;rail yards exceeds 100. Stony Creek granite was supplied to finish the rest of the terminal and is displayed throughout the building.</span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family: tahoma,arial,helvetica,sans-serif;" mce_style="font-family: tahoma,arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: small;" mce_style="font-size: small;">Sources and Info:</span></span></p> <p><a href="http://www.grandcentralterminal.com/index.cfm" mce_href="http://www.grandcentralterminal.com/index.cfm"><img src="http://foundationsofamerica.com/images/stories/grand-central-station-address-2.jpg" mce_src="http://foundationsofamerica.com/images/stories/grand-central-station-address-2.jpg" border="0" height="213" width="408">http://www.grandcentralterminal.com/index.cfm</a><br />Deford, Deborah. <u>Flesh and Stone: Stony Creek and the Age of Granite</u>. Stony Creek, Connecticut: Stony Creek Quarry Workers Celebration, 2000.</p> Henry Ives Cobb, Architect 2010-09-27T21:32:27Z 2010-09-27T21:32:27Z http://www.foundationsofamerica.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=355:henry-ives-cobb-architect&catid=41:built-to-last&Itemid=57 Administrator stleone@shorelineinternet.com <p style="text-align: left;">Open Topic</p> <p style="text-align: left;">Open Topic</p> Stanford White 2010-09-25T21:39:43Z 2010-09-25T21:39:43Z http://www.foundationsofamerica.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=352:stanford-white-201-06-pappasa&catid=41:built-to-last&Itemid=57 201-06-PappasA <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: medium;"><span style="font-family: times new roman,times;"><span style="color: #000000;"><span style="color: #0000ff;"><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><span style="font-size: x-large;"><strong>Stanford White</strong></span></span></span><br /><br />Stanford Wh</span><span style="color: #000000;">ite was born November 9, 18<span style="color: #000000;">53; he was an American architect and a partner in the firm of McKim, Mead, and White in 1880.  This firm soon because the most famous in the country and was known for its Shingle-style country and seaside mansions.   As time progressed the firm led the trend to a Neoclassical architecture.  He was trained with Henry Richardson. White designed a series of houses for the wealthy, various public, religious, and institutional buildings. Whi<span style="color: #000000;">te created the </span></span></span></span></span><span style="font-family: times new roman,times;"><span style="color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: medium;"><span style="font-family: times new roman,times;">architecture for Madison Square Garden and the Washington Arch in New York.  He also designed jewelry</span></span></span><span style="font-size: medium;"><span style="color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: medium;"><span style="font-family: times new roman,times;">, interior, and furniture.  In 1906, White was murdered by the millionaire Harry Thaw ov</span></span></span><span style="color: #000000;"><span style="color: #000000;"><span style="font-family: times new roman,times;">er his affair with Thaw's wife, Evelyn Nesbit. This lead<span style="color: #000000;"> to a trial which was known as the "Trial of the Century". <br /></span></span><span style="color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: medium;"><span style="font-family: times new roman,times;"><br /></span></span></span></span><span style="color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: medium;"><span style="font-family: times new roman,times;"><br /><br /><img src="http://mylifeofcrime.files.wordpress.com/2007/05/stanford-white.jpg" border="0" alt="Stanford White" width="187" height="216" /><br /><br />Sources:<br /></span></span></span></span></span><span style="color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: medium;"><span style="font-family: times new roman,times;">"Biography of Stanford White." <em>Essortment Articles: Free Online Articles on Health, Science, Education & More..</em> Web. 27 Sept. 2010. http://www.essortment.com/all/stanfordwhiteb_rbyy.htm .</span></span></span></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: medium;"><span style="font-family: times new roman,times;"><span style="color: #000000;"><span style="color: #0000ff;"><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><span style="font-size: x-large;"><strong>Stanford White</strong></span></span></span><br /><br />Stanford Wh</span><span style="color: #000000;">ite was born November 9, 18<span style="color: #000000;">53; he was an American architect and a partner in the firm of McKim, Mead, and White in 1880.  This firm soon because the most famous in the country and was known for its Shingle-style country and seaside mansions.   As time progressed the firm led the trend to a Neoclassical architecture.  He was trained with Henry Richardson. White designed a series of houses for the wealthy, various public, religious, and institutional buildings. Whi<span style="color: #000000;">te created the </span></span></span></span></span><span style="font-family: times new roman,times;"><span style="color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: medium;"><span style="font-family: times new roman,times;">architecture for Madison Square Garden and the Washington Arch in New York.  He also designed jewelry</span></span></span><span style="font-size: medium;"><span style="color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: medium;"><span style="font-family: times new roman,times;">, interior, and furniture.  In 1906, White was murdered by the millionaire Harry Thaw ov</span></span></span><span style="color: #000000;"><span style="color: #000000;"><span style="font-family: times new roman,times;">er his affair with Thaw's wife, Evelyn Nesbit. This lead<span style="color: #000000;"> to a trial which was known as the "Trial of the Century". <br /></span></span><span style="color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: medium;"><span style="font-family: times new roman,times;"><br /></span></span></span></span><span style="color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: medium;"><span style="font-family: times new roman,times;"><br /><br /><img src="http://mylifeofcrime.files.wordpress.com/2007/05/stanford-white.jpg" border="0" alt="Stanford White" width="187" height="216" /><br /><br />Sources:<br /></span></span></span></span></span><span style="color: #000000;"><span style="font-size: medium;"><span style="font-family: times new roman,times;">"Biography of Stanford White." <em>Essortment Articles: Free Online Articles on Health, Science, Education & More..</em> Web. 27 Sept. 2010. http://www.essortment.com/all/stanfordwhiteb_rbyy.htm .</span></span></span></span></p> Stony Creek Pink at Home 147 2010-09-22T16:36:09Z 2010-09-22T16:36:09Z http://www.foundationsofamerica.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=339:grand-central-terminal-155&catid=41:built-to-last&Itemid=57 <p>Stony Creek granite can still be seen in Connecticut. Stony Creek granite is used for monuments, exterior walls, front steps, and much more.</p> <p><strong>Church Of Christ</strong></p> <p><img src="http://www.visitbraidwood.com.au/images/CatholicChurch.jpg" border="0" width="228" height="272" /><br />The Church of Christ in Stony Creek,</p> <p>Connecticut was built in 1901-1903. The granite was provide by the Norcross Brothers who donated the granite for use on the Church. Contractor Benjamin F. Hosley began constructing the Church of Christ in 1901. The Church, itself, was designed by architect Ernest S. Greene, who designed the 40-foot granite belltower with castellated battlements, which also houses the main entrance. Stained-glass windows were also added later on to the Church of Christ. Today, the Stony Creek residents simply adore the appeal of the Church, but also find it worrisome.</p> <p>more info: http://www.nytimes.com/1989/01/08/nyregion/view-stony-creek-enlisting-list-keep-community-s-charm-unusullied.html?pagewanted=all</p> <p><strong>Willoughby Wallace Memorial Library</strong><br /><br /><img src="http://www.librarything.com/venuepics/37714-4951c2db63fb4.jpg" border="0" width="250" height="187" /></p> <p>The Willoughby Wallace Memorial Library was built in 1958. The stony granite was donated by the Castellucci & Sonds, Inc. Willoughby Adelbert Wallace bequeathed the majority of this estate to the town for the construction of a public library. The Willoughby Wallace Memorial Library was designed by architect Douglas Orr. Douglass Orr offered to design the library for free because he thought the stony creek granite was "enduring and noble." The stony creek granite covers the exterior walls of the library. Today, the public library is used as the town's public library and a meeting place for cultural meetings. The public library was re-opened in 2002 after renovation and expansion.</p> <p>more info: http://www.wwml.org/about/history.htm</p> <p><strong>Isaac C. Lewis Fountain</strong><br /><img src="http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3231/3096651861_77cf83c0a0.jpg?v=0" border="0" width="272" height="203" /></p> <p>The Isaac C. Lewis Fountain was built in 1917. The Isaac C. Lewis Fountain was given by Kate A.L Chapin, who wanted to commemorate her father, Isaac Chauncy Lewis. The fountain was designed by stonecutter, John Melander. The fountain was probably once used to water animals. The granite blocks used for the fountain are believed to have come from a large boulder found near Three Elms Road.</p> <p>Damascus Cemetery Wall<br />The stony granite Damascus cemetery wall was donated by Timoth L. Barker. The cemetery wall enclose the Damascus cemetery. William Olver compelted the 3.5-foot walls from rough-faced ashlar, which was supplied by the Norcross Brothers.</p> <p>sources:<br />Deford, Deborah. <span style="text-decoration: underline;">Flesh and Stone: Stony Creek and the Age of Granite</span>. Stony Creek, Connecticut: Stony Creek Quarry Workers Celebration, 2000.</p> <p>Stony Creek granite can still be seen in Connecticut. Stony Creek granite is used for monuments, exterior walls, front steps, and much more.</p> <p><strong>Church Of Christ</strong></p> <p><img src="http://www.visitbraidwood.com.au/images/CatholicChurch.jpg" border="0" width="228" height="272" /><br />The Church of Christ in Stony Creek,</p> <p>Connecticut was built in 1901-1903. The granite was provide by the Norcross Brothers who donated the granite for use on the Church. Contractor Benjamin F. Hosley began constructing the Church of Christ in 1901. The Church, itself, was designed by architect Ernest S. Greene, who designed the 40-foot granite belltower with castellated battlements, which also houses the main entrance. Stained-glass windows were also added later on to the Church of Christ. Today, the Stony Creek residents simply adore the appeal of the Church, but also find it worrisome.</p> <p>more info: http://www.nytimes.com/1989/01/08/nyregion/view-stony-creek-enlisting-list-keep-community-s-charm-unusullied.html?pagewanted=all</p> <p><strong>Willoughby Wallace Memorial Library</strong><br /><br /><img src="http://www.librarything.com/venuepics/37714-4951c2db63fb4.jpg" border="0" width="250" height="187" /></p> <p>The Willoughby Wallace Memorial Library was built in 1958. The stony granite was donated by the Castellucci & Sonds, Inc. Willoughby Adelbert Wallace bequeathed the majority of this estate to the town for the construction of a public library. The Willoughby Wallace Memorial Library was designed by architect Douglas Orr. Douglass Orr offered to design the library for free because he thought the stony creek granite was "enduring and noble." The stony creek granite covers the exterior walls of the library. Today, the public library is used as the town's public library and a meeting place for cultural meetings. The public library was re-opened in 2002 after renovation and expansion.</p> <p>more info: http://www.wwml.org/about/history.htm</p> <p><strong>Isaac C. Lewis Fountain</strong><br /><img src="http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3231/3096651861_77cf83c0a0.jpg?v=0" border="0" width="272" height="203" /></p> <p>The Isaac C. Lewis Fountain was built in 1917. The Isaac C. Lewis Fountain was given by Kate A.L Chapin, who wanted to commemorate her father, Isaac Chauncy Lewis. The fountain was designed by stonecutter, John Melander. The fountain was probably once used to water animals. The granite blocks used for the fountain are believed to have come from a large boulder found near Three Elms Road.</p> <p>Damascus Cemetery Wall<br />The stony granite Damascus cemetery wall was donated by Timoth L. Barker. The cemetery wall enclose the Damascus cemetery. William Olver compelted the 3.5-foot walls from rough-faced ashlar, which was supplied by the Norcross Brothers.</p> <p>sources:<br />Deford, Deborah. <span style="text-decoration: underline;">Flesh and Stone: Stony Creek and the Age of Granite</span>. Stony Creek, Connecticut: Stony Creek Quarry Workers Celebration, 2000.</p> Buildings, Monuments and Structures 143 2010-09-20T21:19:40Z 2010-09-20T21:19:40Z http://www.foundationsofamerica.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=326:buildings-monuments-and-structures-143&catid=41:built-to-last&Itemid=57 michelle Laccetti 16 <p>hj</p> <p>hj</p>